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Book Reviews

What Are People Saying About Dr. Bonnick’s Books

Dr. Bonnick’s most recent book, How To Overcome Fear Of The Dentist – A Patient’s Guide To Understanding Dentistry, focuses on educating patients on various dental procedures, good oral hygiene habits, and what the options are under various circumstances. Sometimes lack of understanding makes things look more imposing, and there are not always simple avenues for dental patients to obtain greater knowledge.

Overall, an excellent work. In a day where some books are more like a mere waste of paper than literature, this surprising book stands apart. Though the title seems like the book may appeal to a young audience, it is in fact, a tool for adults. “How to Overcome…” finds a delightful balance between scientific explanation, professional advice, and personal anecdote. It is a book that redefines the expectation of what qualifies as “hard to put down.” Most readers would not consider a medical text to be good bedtime or stuck-in-a-waiting-room reading. In fact, most readers, when caught in a waiting room, have either brought their own book or reach for a quick-skim magazine. If you find yourself in a waiting room with a copy of “How to Overcome…”, save your personal book for later, put down the Redbook or Highlights, and pick it up! I almost guarantee that in one chapter, you’ll be wondering how you can take it with you. Bonnick certainly has the qualifications to write a dental-advice text, but what surprises you is how readable and enjoyable his writing style is. Well worth every page!
Sarah
In many instances, people fear their annual and/or initial visits to the dentist. By having a resource to turn to, a person can find answers to their questions and educate themselves about what the dentist is doing. This book will allow a person to understand dental procedures, allowing them to make the first step toward healthy hygiene and a beautiful smile.
David Yu, DDS
Unfortunately, many people are unaware of how negatively poor dental hygiene impacts their overall health. In this book, Dr. Bonnick takes a big step towards helping people to understand holistic health maintenance.
Andre Spence, M.D.
Overall, an excellent work. In a day where some books are more like a mere waste of paper than literature, this surprising book stands apart. Though the title seems like the book may appeal to a young audience, it is in fact, a tool for adults. “How to Overcome…” finds a delightful balance between scientific explanation, professional advice, and personal anecdote. It is a book that redefines the expectation of what qualifies as “hard to put down.” Most readers would not consider a medical text to be good bedtime or stuck-in-a-waiting-room reading. In fact, most readers, when caught in a waiting room, have either brought their own book or reach for a quick-skim magazine. If you find yourself in a waiting room with a copy of “How to Overcome…”, save your personal book for later, put down the Redbook or Highlights, and pick it up! I almost guarantee that in one chapter, you’ll be wondering how you can take it with you. Bonnick certainly has the qualifications to write a dental-advice text, but what surprises you is how readable and enjoyable his writing style is. Well worth every page!
Sarah
In many instances, people fear their annual and/or initial visits to the dentist. By having a resource to turn to, a person can find answers to their questions and educate themselves about what the dentist is doing. This book will allow a person to understand dental procedures, allowing them to make the first step toward healthy hygiene and a beautiful smile.
David Yu, DDS
Unfortunately, many people are unaware of how negatively poor dental hygiene impacts their overall health. In this book, Dr. Bonnick takes a big step towards helping people to understand holistic health maintenance.
Andre Spence, M.D.
Overall, an excellent work. In a day where some books are more like a mere waste of paper than literature, this surprising book stands apart. Though the title seems like the book may appeal to a young audience, it is in fact, a tool for adults. “How to Overcome…” finds a delightful balance between scientific explanation, professional advice, and personal anecdote. It is a book that redefines the expectation of what qualifies as “hard to put down.” Most readers would not consider a medical text to be good bedtime or stuck-in-a-waiting-room reading. In fact, most readers, when caught in a waiting room, have either brought their own book or reach for a quick-skim magazine. If you find yourself in a waiting room with a copy of “How to Overcome…”, save your personal book for later, put down the Redbook or Highlights, and pick it up! I almost guarantee that in one chapter, you’ll be wondering how you can take it with you. Bonnick certainly has the qualifications to write a dental-advice text, but what surprises you is how readable and enjoyable his writing style is. Well worth every page!
Sarah
In many instances, people fear their annual and/or initial visits to the dentist. By having a resource to turn to, a person can find answers to their questions and educate themselves about what the dentist is doing. This book will allow a person to understand dental procedures, allowing them to make the first step toward healthy hygiene and a beautiful smile.
David Yu, DDS
Unfortunately, many people are unaware of how negatively poor dental hygiene impacts their overall health. In this book, Dr. Bonnick takes a big step towards helping people to understand holistic health maintenance.
Andre Spence, M.D.
Overall, an excellent work. In a day where some books are more like a mere waste of paper than literature, this surprising book stands apart. Though the title seems like the book may appeal to a young audience, it is in fact, a tool for adults. “How to Overcome…” finds a delightful balance between scientific explanation, professional advice, and personal anecdote. It is a book that redefines the expectation of what qualifies as “hard to put down.” Most readers would not consider a medical text to be good bedtime or stuck-in-a-waiting-room reading. In fact, most readers, when caught in a waiting room, have either brought their own book or reach for a quick-skim magazine. If you find yourself in a waiting room with a copy of “How to Overcome…”, save your personal book for later, put down the Redbook or Highlights, and pick it up! I almost guarantee that in one chapter, you’ll be wondering how you can take it with you. Bonnick certainly has the qualifications to write a dental-advice text, but what surprises you is how readable and enjoyable his writing style is. Well worth every page!
Sarah
In many instances, people fear their annual and/or initial visits to the dentist. By having a resource to turn to, a person can find answers to their questions and educate themselves about what the dentist is doing. This book will allow a person to understand dental procedures, allowing them to make the first step toward healthy hygiene and a beautiful smile.
David Yu, DDS

TMJ, Headaches, and Facial Pains

(Special note to patients – this subject can be very complicated and is meant to inform you of the complexity of self-diagnosis. We seriously advise you to seek the help of a professional in this area. Consult your dental professional for further advice.)

TMJ is not a medical condition; it is a joint that articulates the lower jaw to the base of the skull. The lower jaw that articulates with a disk that articulates with the skull is called the condyle. There is a disk between the rounded joint and the base of the skull, so unless you have a worn disk, there will not be direct bone to bone contact. The condyles can come under extreme stress when the mouth is crushing food; the patient is clenching or grinding or oral habits like nail-biting, chewing gum, and trauma. A small muscle attaches in the front part of the disk and pulls it forward when the lower jaw translates forward, and damage to the disk or slipping of the disk compromises the area between the muscle and the disk and causes pain.

Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD)

Any disorder to the condyles, disk, or muscles supporting chewing is called temporomandibular disorder (TMD), and this is the correct way to talk about problems in this area. TMD can strike at any time in life but seems to show up after a traumatic event or during a time of increased stress. Close to 90 percent of TMD results from muscle spasms and can be corrected with physical therapy, bite splints, and medications. The remaining disorders may have to be treated surgically or may continue as part of a systemic condition such as arthritis.

Headaches and Facial Pains

TMD can also trigger other headaches as your body recruits other muscles to move the head and neck. Headaches can also come from referred pain from areas called “trigger points.” Infections, high blood pressure, trauma, bouts of migraine, tumors, teeth coming together in negative ways (malocclusion), and other physiological processes can all cause headaches. Your dentist may request tests, refer you to a specialist, or try to treat dental conditions that may aggravate your situation. To rule out a tumor, you will need to pay attention to pain in the head and neck region of non-dental origin.

Facial pain refers to any conditions that cause abnormal and painful conditions in the head and neck region. Some dentists limit their practice to this area, and they are very well informed and can diagnose and treat many conditions. Many medical specialists specialize in treating chronic pain, and they use many forms of therapy to help patients.

Chronic pain often has a psychological component, so referral to a professional for counseling is not uncommon when treating facial pain.